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The Gridley Herald
Gridley , California
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June 4, 1980     The Gridley Herald
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June 4, 1980
 

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Wednesday, June 4, 1980 - THE GRIDLEY HERALD - Section 1, page 5 (lletes |highlight of the recent Man- |~lt)orls Awards Banquet was i.lng of eighth graders Shun- and Danny Jo tr so as Iing girl and boy a hie e of Manzanita students, /and parents gather to- Ihonor the school s parti- In after-school sports. I era of diminishing school / Manzanita has continued its competitive sports I' with the help of teachers, parents and high school ing a potluck dinner and "11ilion of Manzanita Booster all students who partici- the school's sports teams certificates from the Plaques for the most ire- 'land most valuable players ten awarded in each sport. / I~ldition, Manzanita studem i' ,|llPitkr ;Ip;a s faTarduedst: ng ganship, r ' tbanquet was also an oppo for the students to s o preciation to the coached orked with the fourt eighth grade teams. The Is presented a gift to each School's coaches for year include: Mike Greer Pantaleoni, flag foot- Shelton and Carolyn volleyball; Jon Macfar- Pantaleoni and Jeff basketball; Joe Luiz and basketball; Dorothy t and Jeff Sheline, softball; 'n Nelson and Wanda track. Jeo here at fairgrounds annual Butte College Rodeo luled for Saturday, June 7, LGolden Feather Fairgrounds ley, starting at i I a.m. [llsored by the college's , and Riding Club, of which : Oscki of Chico is president, vent is expected to attract than 100 contestants for tition in 10 rodeo categories. competition will be in ck riding, breakaway roping bull riding, call rop- ~na roping, barrel racing for II, ribbon roping, steer riding Omen, cowhide racing and I nding for women. kles will be awarded to win- n rnost events. Jackpot prizes to contestants placing first hide races and ribbon rop- rhe contestants selected as round Cowboy and All- rid Cowgirl each will receive a L ~als for the rodeo "*ill be ~ed by stock contractor Dan ~1 of the Western Rodeo ~ation. Russell also provides for the annual California ~0ys Association champion- rodeo in Folsom. Butte College Rodeo is open ~h school students m grades 9 [, College students age 23 and L~ho are carrying a minimum I,'~ undergraduate academic land any between of 18 contestant and 22. imming lessons ups planned %ps for swimming lessons rner under the direction of , erican Red Cross will be fluter this month and in early Ups for the June 23 to July 7 will be held June 19-20 10 a.m. to noon and 2 to 4 July 14-25 session signups i held Jui 10-11 at the same L Y ' Ups will be held in the direc- rOom of the Butte County OUnds. lessons will be under the ton of Debbie LaFever. Other iu?etors are needed. Applicants be 18, hold a WSI card, and in CPR and First Aid. apply, or for more informa- Leail LaFever at 868-1130 or Roberts at 846-2360. ve Stuart singled in the win- on a full-count pitch with Uts as the Oaks defeated the , 9-8. Leading hitters were Santana, Rusty Cox and bluli. Oaks went on to defeat the Is 14-6 behind the bats of Hull, Rusty Cox and Ben another contest, Waily bt rn hit a grand-slammer and another home as the Indians the Padres, 15-3. Ricky also homered for the ~S. MANZANITA ATHLETES - Pictured here are the recent winners of the most valuable player (MVP) and most improved player (MI) awards given at the annual Manzanita Sports Awards Banquet. They are (L-R): Lynda Nelson, MVP in basketball and track; Brigette Harming, M! in volleyball; Martha Aldrich, MVP in volleyball; Shannon Berry, MI in softball; Helena Marshall, MVP in softball; Bryan Nelson, M! in flag football; Shannon Bell, M! in basketball and athlete of the year; John Pickel, MVP in flag football and sportsmanship award; Tom Roach, MI in basketball; Danny Johnson, MVP in basketball and athlete of the year; Darin Pantaleoni, MVP in basketball; Jill Ward, MVP in track; and Dan Powers, MVP in track. Not pictured are David Cardenas, M! in basketball and Harle~ North, MVP in track. means more injuries With spring many of us feel the urge to get outdoors - take part in sports - work in the garden. The in- creased physical exercise is very valuable, health authorities say, but common sense is needed. Experts say people not only feel better but actually remain healthier when they get regular exercise. Systems of the human body seem to work best during physical activi- ty. Children are born with bodies capable of strenuous activity, but it doesn't take many years of living in a society of laborsaving machines for muscles unchallenged by hard work to become slack. Tile joints which are moved and braced by the tendons are less protected and the ligaments which hold the joints together are exposed to in- jury. It is with this sort of weakened body machinery that many Amer- icans enter sports and other strenuous activities. The results are painfully familiar: muscles abrupt- ly called on to perform unac- customed work become sore; weak ligaments suddenly pulled and twisted become strained. Physical condition should be matched with anticipated activity. According to the California HONORED - These Gridley High School students were honored with Automotive Achievement Awards, a state award given by the non-profit organization Pacific Automotive Show. The students are judged on their work during the year and their interest in going into the field after high school graduation. In addition, Brett Storm was awarded $50 and has been nominated for the Top Ten Student honor. Pictured are (L-R) Gary Hughes, teacher Steve Ostling, Chris Smith, Brett Storm, Dennis Hampton, Don Mich, owner of K&D Auto Parts, and Lauro Del Rio. Medical Association, the best ap- proach is to stay in condition all of the time with a daily fitness pro- gram. E~en "*hen you are in top condi- tion, an accident can result in in- jury. The most common are contu- sions and sprains. A contusion is a bruise resulting from a blo\v, usually accompanied by swelling and/or discoloration. For severe contusions, doctors say, the best treatment consists of wrapping the joint with an elastic support, cold [ice] application and rest. A sprain results "*hen a joint is bent or twisted beyond its normal range. While strong muscles tend to keep this from happening, in an acci- dent the muscles may be over- pov, ered and the ligaments of the joint torn. Again, immediate treat- ment consists of wrapping and cold applications. Any continued severe pain or swelling should be seen by a doctor. Doctors may ap- ply strapping or even a cast in severe sprains. A severmmjury may also cause a fracture. X-rays often provide the only means of ruling out bone fractures. Fatigue is another factor which contributes to athletic injuries. Tired muscles are not able to pro- vide adequate joint protection. So, before you head for the ten- nis court, the lake, the wheelbar- row, the rake - remember that you '.'ill enjoy it more and avoid needless injury by observing these simple rules: --Pre-condition your muscles. Get in shape gradually. --Avoid extreme fatigue. Rest from time to time or limit exercise to reasonable periods. --Don't attempt activities beyond your ability. --Apply proper care should an accidenl occur. --It nmy be helpful to get a check-up before starting a new and vigorous sport activity such as/ra- qvetball, running or tennis. School Wilson School's play area ',',as filled with third graders, parents, and timekeepers on a recent t:riday afternoon. All wcrc gathered to participate in or v, atch the second hall" of that school's annual track meet. Three third grade records were broken by Cindy Williams in the girls pole climb, Brandy Onyett in the boys standing broad jump and grin Schmidt in the girls 45 meter dash. Erin Schmidt also came in first in the standing broad amp. f)t her exceptional performers in- cluded Kristina Sharer winning both the standing hop, step and jump plus the softball throxs for distance. Todd Hull and Robert lzaguirre turned in the only dual wins in the boys cdmpetition. THIRI) GRADE GIRI.S Standing Hop, Step and Jump - Kristina Sharer, 15-8. Pole Climb - Cindy Williams, 3.0 (new record). Softball Thro~ for Distance - Kristina Sharer, 95-5. Softball Thro for Aceurac) - Tiffiny Haury, 80 percent. 60 Yard Dash - Jill Mardesich, n/a. Standing Broad Jump - Erin Schmidt, 5-6. Tag violators lose privileges Some 3,000 California deer hunters face prosecution if they apply for tags for the 1980 seasons, the Department of Fish and Game announced this week. Included are about 2,800 persons x ho received t979 zone X tags and failed to return them as required by lax , and approximately 200 others who convicted of tag ,.iolations last season. Names of tt3e violators in both instances have been entered into a DFG corn.purer and will be checked against key-punch applications for 1980 tags. Applicants v.hose name appear on the violators' list will be prosecuted, the DFG emphasized. File requirement for return of all zone X tags -- u hether the hunter x~as successful or not -- was in- stituted ill 1978 ~llcn the zone sys- tem for California deer hunting ~a,, adopted. Failure to comply carried the penalty of los,, of hunt- ing pri~ilege~ for the tollo~ing year. Objectke of tile requirement ~as to encourage tile ~ alidation of deer tags and to ~mide an accu- rate record of the kill in critical areas of norfl~eastern California. the eastern slope of t! e central Sierra and in lnyo and Mono coun- ties. Hinderer, the DFG said, viola- tors neither prosecuted nor denied a tag the follo ing year in consideration of the fact that the program was nev,. For 1979, the same rule was in effect. Hunters were required to return tags ithin 30 days of tile close of the season. In all effort to avoid prosecu- tion, xiolators ~et'e sent letters of ~arning and gixen an additional 120 days to respond. Nevertheless, approximately 2,8()O of the tags for 1979 have not been returned. 120 Foot Shuttle Run Kim Potoski, I 1.0. 40 ~ard Dash Angelica Ramirez, 7. I. 45 Meter Dash - grin Schmidt, 7.7 (new record). 160 Yard Shuttle Rela) - Room 12, n/a. THIRD GRADE BOYS Hop, Step and Jump - Tobi McMurtry, 14-6. Pole Climb- Todd Hull, 3, Softball lhrow for Distance - Robert lzaguirre, l 11-5. Football l"hrow for Distance - Todd Hull, 89-0. Standing Broad Jump - Brandy Onyet'., 5-9 {new record). 40 }ard Dash - Angel Diaz. 7.0. 45 Meter Dash - Marcus Stenzel, 8.7. 60 ~ard Dash - Robert lzaguirre, 9,5. 160 Yard Shuttle Rela) - Room 14, 26.9. Hunting licenses available soon Hunting licenses and deer tag applications for 1980 seasons x ill be on sale with agents throughout the state the x eekend of June 7-8, the Department of Fish and Game announced today. DI--G license chief Mac Foster said his schedule calls for mailing of the first shipment of licenses and tags June 4. An estimated 300,0( deer tag applications and an e en larger number of licenses, along xsith up- aards of 6,000 of the large, detail- ed maps of deer hunting zones in color, will go to the more than 3,000 sporting goods stores and other agencies. License fees are S10.25 for residents, S2 for resident juniors [under 16 years] and $36.25 for nonresidents. Tag application fees are S3 for one deer and $8 for deer for residents, and S26 and $62.50, respectixel.v, for non- residents. Again thi,, year, hunters be required to mail tag applications to Sacramento headquarters. Tags be returned by mail. Applications for permit-only deer hunts must be received in Sacramento b3 5 p.m. July 3. They xsill be ax~arded after a public dra~sing at DFG headquarters Jul.v 7. Instructions on applying for" deer hunt tags are included in hunting regulations booklets, also affable license agent , and at Fish and Game offices around the State. Applicatiom, for permits for the 1980 antelope htmt Aug. 23-Sept. 1 in the northeastern plains country be mailed June 5. These must be rettlrned in time to reach Sacramento by 5 p.m. July 10 for the drawing to be held July 18. W CB will meet on June 23 in Sacto A meeting of the state \Vildtife Conservation Board has been scheduled for 3 p.m. June 23 in Sacramento at a site to be selected. The WCB acquires property for and de elops fish and ildlife con- serx at-ion projects. Fish & Game Sat. July 12 - [DFG] Open ar- chery deer hunting season in nor- thern and central coast counties. Sun. July 27 - [DFG] Close ar- chery deer hunting season in nor- thern and central coast counties. Fri. Aug. I - [FGC] Fish and Game Commission meeting in Eureka. [Adoption of resident game bird hunting regulations.] Sat. Aug. 2 - [DFG] Open deer hunting season in northern and central coast counties. Open tree squirrel hunting season in Matin, Napa, Solano, and Sonoma coun- ties, portion of Lake County. Open archery and falconry tree squirrel hunting season. Aug. I, Fri. -(FGC) Fish and t.iame Commission meeting in Eureka. {Adoption of resident game bird hunting regulations.) Aug. 2, Sat. - (ill'G) Open deer hunting season in northern and central coast counties. Open trec squirrel hunting sea- son in Marin, Napa, Solano and Sononla counties, porliou of Lake County. Open archery and falconry trcc squirrel hunling season. Over 250 million pounds of bread are produced each week in the tJ.S., according to Spet ry New Holland. H&M Indoor- Outdoor ROBINSON'S CORNER, HIWA Y 70 Saturday & Sunday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. PH. 846-b505 5RC IN$ON'$ CORNER INSTALLATION SUPPLIES * REFRIGERATION REPAIR Ill. l[l Ig laVl El PHONE 846-3584 llome - 846-6116 kbrmerl~ Walter Jensen & 24 YEARS EXPERIENCE WE CARRY- Gridley Brand and Lincoln Brand Feed, Dog Food & Stock Supplies. WE OFFER- Custom grinding, roiling, mixing and seed cleaning. NOW TAKING ORDERS FOR SEED OAT CLEANING Open Man. tkru PrL 8-5 and ,~L 8-1 1111t.311111 680 Kentncku Street - Ph. 846-5634 , BICYCLES. ACCESSORIES TIRES. TUBES. PARTS - liEPAIRS - Serving Gridley for over 25 years PHONE TUNE-UPS- BRAKES GENERAL AUTO REPAIR DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN "VOLKSWAGEN sPEqALISTS" uJt TUUE 8ZZ a. r, ad , CA Hutiq & Air Condltlmlng